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Baker's cyst

A Baker’s cyst is an accumulation of fluid in the back (posterior) aspect of your knee. It denotes that something is wrong inside the joint, which is causing the production of the fluid. Often a Baker’s cyst is associated with a tear or injury to the meniscus, the cushion cartilage in the knee. It is important to find the cause of the swelling because swelling has what we call degradative enzymes in it--components that break down cartilage and tissue in the joint. Chronic swelling of the joint is not good for the joint surfaces; therefore, careful diagnosis and a treatment plan should be started. Physical therapy such as Ice, soft tissue massage, anti-inflammatory, compression are good first steps for symptom relief. Aspiration of the cyst with a cortisone injection is sometimes helpful. Surgical repair of the underlying problem usually cures the cyst.
Avoid joint replacement
You are told you have knee arthritis. The advice the doctor gives you is to go home, rest your knee, take anti-inflammatory drugs, lose some weight, wait until you are older and then get an artificial knee replacement. This advice is awful. Here's why.
Data everywhere, and nowhere to hide. In the bad old days, you got injured, and you didn’t tell anyone. You usually recovered. Lived to play another day. Until you couldn’t. Today, you get injured; you could be monitored, measured, uploaded and reported to everyone. You might not be allowed to play. You are “protected”, maybe even blacklisted. Which scenario is better?
If you want to be treated with a better than 75% chance of success—and if you value excellence as much as kindness—I suggest you demand that creativity be part of the doctor’s repertoire.
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In light of Wes Matthews and other NBA athletes suffering Achilles ruptures, Dr. Stone speaks to Mavs Moneyball, a...
April 27th, 2016
Dr Stone talking about Steph Curry's injury and the Warrior's season.
December 11th, 2014
"A few select orthopedic surgeons and researchers around the country are pioneering alternate cartilage...

Stone, K.R., A.W. Walgenbach, A. Freyer, T.J. Turek, and D.P. Speer. 2006.

Kevin R. Stone · Jonathan R. Pelsis · Scott T. Surrette · Ann W. Walgenbach · Thomas J. Turek